Sely Martini believes the fight against corruption in Indonesia begins at home. The 34-year-old mother of two is a deputy coordinator with the country’s top anti-corruption watchdog, Indonesia Corruption Watch (ICW). She says mothers and young people represent the nation’s best hope to rise above its legacy of graft, which took root decades ago under former dictator Suharto.

ICW is a network of law experts and campaign volunteers that fights corruption on many fronts, from petty bribery to land grabs, illegal logging, embezzlement and buying votes on election day. The group works closely with the country’s anti-corruption court, known as the KPK, to build cases against corrupt officials and root out Indonesia’s entrenched networks of graft.

In this 100Voices video, Sely talks about Indonesia’s precarious future, and her passion for justice against a culture of impunity.

Sely spoke at Transparency International’s 15th International Anti-Corruption Conference in Brasília last month. She was interviewed by 100Reporters’ Chad Bouchard.

Chad Bouchard
Chad Bouchard, a staff writer for 100 Reporters, is an investigative journalist focusing on politics and corruption. His stories have appeared in The Washington Post Magazine, The Sunday Telegraph, The Financial Times and other publications. His radio stories have aired on NPR, Public Radio International, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, and the Voice of America.

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